Missoula Fly Fishing Report

Missoula Fishing Report 10/1

Fly Fishing Report Brought To You By Our Missoula Fly Fishing Guides And Fly Shop Staff.

Enjoy and Good Luck!

Bitterroot River

The bugs are really happening on the Bitterroot, with strong hatches even on the sunny days. The Mahoganies have been steady in the afternoons with the D&D Cripple and Mahogany Sprout working very well. The Tilting and Brindle Chute are also working, especially on lone risers. When you decide to work the bottom, the Orange Spot Pheasant Tail, Duracell and the Perdigon Butano are moving the nymphing trout.

The BWO’s are also strong, and really getting fish to pod up. Again, the cripples and mergers are working better than a standard dry. Look to the Film Critic, Split Flag and Last Chance Cripple to take the fish at the top of the pod. The Comparadun BWO is also a strong Bitterroot fly, and the Lexi GED is also finding a few trout. Stick a Hi-Viz Spinner in your box as well, for when the fish focus on that phase. The Olive SR Bullet, the Quill Bullet and the Olive Quill Bomb are doing good work on the bottom, if you can drag yourself away from the risers.

The Hecubas are having a decent season. While not prolific, make sure to have a Bigger Brindle Chute in the in case you find them. The October Caddis are also getting stronger, and the Orange Elk Hair Caddis with trimmed hackle has been very effective. The Foam October Caddis has also been moving fish on the surface. Be ready for the Pupa with a Bird Of Prey or the Orange Mop Fly.

For those hunting big fish, the streamer bite is on along the length of the river. Keep your streamer light and thin, especially if you’re wading. The Skiddish Smolt, Emma’s Mod Maisden and of course smaller Sparkle Minnows are all doing the job. If you’re floating, a bigger streamer like a Gold Double Fuego or the Baby Swim Coach is making it happen. The brighter the day, the closer you need to be to structure, so plan your buying accordingly!

Scroll to the bottom of this page for additional fly patterns and tips for each hatch

Blackfoot River

The Blackfoot is beginning to shut down for the fall. There’s no reason too be on the water before 11:00 Am, and the day is mostly over by 5:00. The October Caddis, Mahoganies and Blue Wings are all out and moving, but it feels like every day the dry fly fishing gets a just a touch slower as the temperatures drop. Finding rising fish can be a bit of a challenge, but when you do, it’s not very complicated.

For the October Caddis, the Foam Body has been very good. It floats in the roiling water, and pulls fish up. The bigger Morrish October Caddis is a sneaky good call up here- that bigger silhouette get’s at trout’s attention. The Orange Mop Fly and Morrish Pupa are making it happen subsurface.

The Tilt Wing Mahogany, Purple Haze and Brindle Chute are working when the Mahoganies are out. Have a cripple or two if the fish get snotty, but it hasn’t been critical. Get a quick sinking brown jig to get things going underneath. Same can be said for the BWO’s- Tilt Wings and the Lexi GED are working when you find risers. So small and olive subsurface, but you might do better with a deep TJ Hooker or Pat’s. The Blackfoot isn’t known for small nymphing.

The streamer fishing has been really good. If you have a slow sink tip, now is the time to bring it out. The big Browns are moving, so bring your White streamers and have a good size range. Depending on your rig, White Mini Dungeons and Mongrel Meat are working with the sink tip. The Sculpzilla and White Fishwhacker are perfect for a lighter set up

The same can be said for Olive and Tan streamers. Bigger streamers are working right now- as always, make sure you have the set-up to throw what you get. Deeper is better, so a sink tip or sinking leader is not a bad idea. If you head to the Blackfoot, make sure you’re on the water mid afternoon. The heat of the day is now your friend, so make sure you take advantage

Scroll to the bottom of this page for additional fly patterns and tips!

Clark Fork River

The Clark Fork has been a bit spotty this fall. The hatches are there, no question, but the consistency of daily pods hasn’t been seen. Be ready to do a bit more searching for rising fish, because fish rising yesterday in one spot doesn’t guarantee they’re rising there today. With that said, there are bugs along the length of the Clark Fork, especially the lower. Look for the Mahoganies to get stronger as we enter October. The Purple Haze, Mahogany Tilt Wing and Copper Haze are taking most fish when they’re podded up. If you want the lead fish, you might want to switch to a Sprout or D&D Cripple for the biggest snouts. Underneath, the Carmel Jig and Pheasant ail jig are moving trot lower in the water column.

The BWO’s are still responding to the sun, so clouds are still important. On the cloudy days, the fish are really up, and the BWO Last Chance Cripple, Split Flag Cripple and Fly tics are taking the fussiest risers. Make sure to have a Hi-Viz BWO Spinner when the trout move to them, and have a Tilt Wing or Parachute when the fishing gets easier. Have you SR Olive Bullet or Olive MicroDrop for the fish on the bottom. While not a BWO, the TJ Hooker or Pat’s Rubber Legs deep is a constant on the Middle and lower Clark.

If you have streamers on your mind, the entire length of the river is kicking out some big fish. Above Drummond, the Sculpin Sparkle Minnow, Emma’s Mod Minnow and the Mini Dungeon have been moving some big fish. Get lower, and the Sculpzilla has been working, as has the Double Fuego and the Baby Gonga. If you want to go big, toss an articulated Dirty Hippie and get it deep. The Lower Clark has been good with streamers, but most are looking for snouts! If you decide to get big, the White Peanut Envy or Mongrel Meat have been moving some big Browns.

Scroll to the bottom of this page for additional fly patterns and tips!

Rock Creek

The fall hatches are in full swing on Rock Creek. Whether looking to search with an October Caddis or find risers to BWO’s and Mahoganies, Rock Creek is fishing well. The Foam Run October Caddis is the perfect dry for bouncy water, while the Orange Elk Hair Caddis is working well too. Sub-surface, the Bird of Prey and the Caddy Shack are working as a caddis pupa.

The Mahoganies are not so prolific that you need to get super technical, which means the Purple Haze, Mahogany Tilt Wing and Brindle Chute are working well on the surface. As the hatch progresses, the flies will get more technical, but keep it simple now. The Carmel Nymph and Orange Spot Pheasant Tail Jig are working well underneath.

BWO’s are also on the water, and quite prolific. Be ready for a bit more technical fishing with a BWO Sprout, Last Chance Cripple or a HackleMaster. The standard parachutes are working, but not as well. When you go deep, the SR Olive Bullet and the Olive MicroDrop are working well. And while it’s not a BWO nymph, the TJ Hooker in a size 12 is working ion the deeper holes.

The Browns are starting to moving up river for their fall dance, so a white streamer is going to work for those cruisers. The bigger resident fish are also looking for big grub, and the Sculpin Sparkle Minnow, Baby Swim Coach and the Dirty Hippie are seeing a lot of action. The larger streamers haven’t been as popular as the mid size and smaller streamers, so keep that in mind. A sinking leader is useful in the deeper holes- keep the tippet short to maximize sink.

Scroll to the bottom of this page for additional fly patterns and tips!

FallHatches

Click any photo below to find out more information on each individual hatch. Includes life cycle, best fly patterns, helpful tips and where to find these hatches in your Western Montana fly fishing adventure.

Missoula Fly Fishing Report

Missoula Fishing Report 8/26

Fly Fishing Report Brought To You By Our Missoula Fly Fishing Guides And Fly Shop Staff.

Enjoy and Good Luck!

Bitterroot River

The Bitterroot river has benefited from cool daytime temps, colder and longer nights, and recent rain. Fishing has improved a lot and hoot owl has been lifted, meaning you can now fish all day long. As the nights get longer, the fishing will continue to improve for the rest of august and into September. Hopper fishing has been the most consistent but there has been some great Trico hatches in the morning and on cloudy rainy days the Hecuba Mayfly has been great. September should be great this year on the Bitterroot and the rest of our local streams.

Scroll to the bottom of this page for additional fly patterns and tips for each hatch

Blackfoot River

The Blackfoot has been fishing good lately with the cooler temps and should continue to produce plenty of fish for the rest of the season. Hopper fishing has been the go to and dropper fishing during the mid day lull will keep you busy. The cooler water temps brings some great streamer fishing this time of year. Trico’s are around but the trico is one of the least important hatches on the Blackfoot as the big fish just don’t show a lot of attention to them like the pods on the Clark Fork and Bitterroot do. Ant’s and beetles have also been good and always a good fly to have in your box this time of year for all of our rivers.

Scroll to the bottom of this page for additional fly patterns and tips!

Clark Fork River

The Clark Fork hoot owl restrictions have been lifted and you are now able to fish all day long. Like the Bitterroot, the Clark Fork has really improved lately with the colder night time temps and rain we’ve received lately. And with longer nights ahead, fishing in September should be great as always. The Trico fishing has been awesome during the spinner fall mid morning and hopper fishing picks up the slack when the spinner fall slows down. Be prepared for good Hecuba hatches on the lower river during cloudy rainy days. The upper to the lower stretches have all been fishing good lately and should be good from here on out with water conditions looking solid.

Scroll to the bottom of this page for additional fly patterns and tips!

Rock Creek

Rock Creek continues to fish good and like the other rivers in the area, has improved a lot with the needed cooler temps and rain. Streamer fishing has been great and will only get better as fall approaches. Dry fly fishing with hoppers, Ants and Beetles is the main game on Rock Creek right now. There are hatches of Tricos, but like the Blackfoot, this is just not an important hatch on the Creek usually. We’re excited for a great September and October on Rock Creek and the rest of our local streams with this much needed and surprising cool down we’ve seen lately.

Scroll to the bottom of this page for additional fly patterns and tips!

August Hatches

Click any photo below to find out more information on each individual hatch. Includes life cycle, best fly patterns, helpful tips and where to find these hatches in your Western Montana fly fishing adventure.

Missoula Fly Fishing Report

Missoula Fly Fishing Report 8/6

Fly Fishing Report Brought To You By Our Missoula Fly Fishing Guides And Fly Shop Staff.

Enjoy and Good Luck!

Bitterroot River

The cooler temps forecast will change how the Bitterroot is fishing. The clockwork pre-dawn/dawn fishing will begin a bit later with cooler water and air temps. The waning PMD’s and tricos will also hatch later in the day, and the morning hopper fishing may be delayed to early afternoon.

Please note- Hoot Owl hours are still in effect until FWP lifts them. Specific parameters must be met before restrictions can be removed, so even if the weather and water are cooler, Hoot Owl hours are in place. So until FWP makes the call, no fishing after 2:00 PM.

These cooler days don’t often come in august, but when they do, fishing can be spectacular with the cooler water temps and cloud cover. Dry fly fishing might take a little longer to get going in the morning, especially on the upper stretches.

Start looking for Crane Flies on the ‘Root. They’ve been seen, but the cooler weather will extend their activity, so if you run into an unfamiliar hatch, the culprit may be the cranefly. The Dry Crane is working on the surface, while the Silverman Cranefly Larva and Smethurst Crane Bomb are working sub-surface. While not prolific, trout look for craneflies because they’re a big meal.

Scroll to the bottom of this page for additional fly patterns and tips for each hatch

Blackfoot River

The change in weather is going to change fishing on the Blackfoot in a big way. Not only will there be less need to be on the water super early, the evening hatches are going to become fishable. With extreme heat, the evening hatches are pushed back to dusk and later. With cooler temps, the caddis and the few remaining PED’s will start much earlier, giving the angler a chance to actually fish them.

The fish won’t be forced into the riffles for oxygen during the day, so working the slower water later in the day will be more effective in the next week. The clouds will get the fish rising more freely.

The hoppers will start later in the day, and the clouds will help bring the trout to the surface with more regularity. We’ll still have an afternoon lull, which is normal, but the lull will be shorter and less intense. Look for the Blackfoot to fish well all day for the next few days, so take advantage.

Scroll to the bottom of this page for additional fly patterns and tips!

Clark Fork River

The cooler temps and cloudy weather will do nothing but help how the Clark Fork is fishing. The fishing will begin later in the morning, so no need to be on the water before first light unless you’re chasing the big browns that move into the shallows to feed at night. If you’re targeting those fish, use a mouse or a larger neutrally buoyant streamer like a Dungeon or an Articulated Fathead. 15 pound test is not overkill for these fish.

Please note: Hoot Owl hours are still in effect on the Clark Fork. Until the temperature parameters are met, and FWP lifts the restrictions, there is no fishing after 2:00 PM, no matter what the water and air temperatures are.

The waning PMD’s and tricos are going to start later in the day than they have in the last 2 weeks. Expect more action on the surface with the cloud cover. The hoppers won’t move as early in the day as they have been, but they will be out, and there are more every day.

Scroll to the bottom of this page for additional fly patterns and tips!

Rock Creek

As the weather cools, look for Rock creek to fish well for the entire day. You can be on the water at dawn, with a streamer, but look for the spinner fall to come later. The waning PMD’s and Spruce Moths will start a bit later in the day, but the cloud cover will allow the trout to rise a bit more freely.

The terrestrial fishing will also start later in the day, and will extend later in the day as well. While hoppers are always the first choice, make sure to have your ants and beetles, because those have been moving a lot of fish in the last week. While high heat gets terrestrials more active, it’s not going to get so cold they stop moving. The terrestrial fishing has been the most consistent fishing on Rick Creek.

The biggest change will be in the evening fishing. With the high temps we’ve had, the evening rise has started at dusk. As the weather cools, the the caddis and remaining PED’s will start a lot earlier, allowing the angler to actually fish those hatches.

Trout love the clouds, and will rise much more freely under a darker sky. Classic attractors will start to be very effective on Rock Creek in the next week. The Hippie Stomper, Purple Haze, Royal Wulff and Micro Chubbies are going to be very effective during the cool spell. You can work a little outside the riffles as well, because the fish aren’t being forced there due to the heat.

Scroll to the bottom of this page for additional fly patterns and tips!

August Hatches

Click any photo below to find out more information on each individual hatch. Includes life cycle, best fly patterns, helpful tips and where to find these hatches in your Western Montana fly fishing adventure.

Missoula Fly Fishing Report

Missoula Fishing Report 7/23

Fly Fishing Report Brought To You By Our Missoula Fly Fishing Guides And Fly Shop Staff.

Enjoy and Good Luck!

Bitterroot River

The Bitterroot river is under Hoot Owl restrictions from the west and east fork of the Bitterroot confluence to the confluence with the Clark Fork. No fishing between 2pm and midnight on that section. Get on the water early and stop fishing by 2pm.

If you’re on the water early enough, you might run into a Rusty Spinner fall. The Hi-Vis Rusty Spinner or standard Rusty Spinner are both effective. They’ll also work during the PMD hatch, as well as dusk. Make sure you have a couple if you head to the Bitterroot.

This will surprise no one- the Purple Haze is a consistent producer along the length of the river. Make sure you have a couple for searching. And while searching have some terrestrials as well. The Ant Acid Black/Purple, Stubby Chubby Tan and Jake’s No Sink Ant are working well on the surface. Get serious and drop an Ant Raid off the back of a small foamy. The sunken ant is often overlooked by anglers, but not by trout.

The hoppers are starting to appear just as the Goldens are falling off. Make sure to have some smaller Tan Hoppers, like a Morrish or Henneberry. Both will cover hoppers and a golden. Bring your yellow sallies as well. They hang on a bit longer on the Bitterroot. The PMD’s are still bringing fish to the surface as well. The Last Chance Cripple, Brooks Sprout and the Missing Link will move some of the fussier fish. A longer tippet will be of benefit.

Stick your trico box in the bag. They haven’t established yet, but sporadic clouds have been seen. The heat is bringing that hatch on, and you don’t want to get caught with rising fish and no tiny bugs.

The evening hatch of Pale Evening Duns and Tan caddis is still occurring, but the hotter the day, the later the hatch will occur. If you’re chasing those bugs, be ready to be on the water till afterwork. If you do hatch match till after dark, fish a mouse home, because you just never know.

When you head subsurface, make sure you’re deep. 3-5 foot fluorocarbon droppers will put your nymph where it needs to be. Nothing is standing out in the standard nymphs, but the Firetstarter has been more effective than its color would suggest. The Yellow Spot Pheasant Tail and Bullet Quill have been successful.

Scroll to the bottom of this page for additional fly patterns and tips for each hatch

Blackfoot River

Despite the heat, the Blackfoot River has been holding it’s own. Some of the sections are getting a bit bony for floating, but the wade fishing is starting to get very good. With the heat, the lower sections are unfishable in the afternoon, due to recreational floaters. If you want to float Johnsrud to Weigh, or Weigh to Spray, be on the water early and off by noon. You’ll have some floaters, but not the insanity of a hot summer day.

Early mornings have been strong with streamers, and remains that way till the sun climbs over the canyon. A small articulated Baby Gonga or Swim Coach are small enough to not spook fish in low water but mobile enough to get action. If you have a slow sink tip, use it, but it’s not necessary.

Or you can work the nocturnal stone hatch. A big Pat’s Rubberlegs or a TJ Hooker will get it done sub-surface, while the Sweetwater Hopper or Fluttering Stone will bring them to the top.

The Goldens are petering out but the hoppers are starting. Put on a small Golden like an ODB, Evan’s baby Stone Tan or a Morrish Hopper for a fly that does double duty. The PMD’s are still about, but bring your A game and some cripples, because the trout have been eating these for about a month and know what they want. Presentation is critical.

Presentation is less critical with the Spruce Moths, which are starting to move. The Parachute Spruce or the Spruce Almighty are good in the slower water, while a Tan Micro Chubby floats in faster water where fish are holding in the heat.

The nymphing has been good up here as well, with the Duracell and Orange Spot Pheasant Tail standing out for performance. It’s more about getting the fly to the fish, especially as the heat of the day comes on, so add some more depth to your dropper for better results.

The Pale Evening Duns are still out, as are the Tan Caddis. However, the evening rise is defined by the heat- the hotter the day, the later and shorter the hatch. Be ready to be on water after sundown on the hot days.

Scroll to the bottom of this page for additional fly patterns and tips!

Clark Fork River

There is Hoot Owl restrictions on the Clark Fork River from the confluence with the Flathead River to the confluence of Warm Springs Creek and Silver Bow Creek. This means you can fish to 2pm. Get on early and off by 2pm. There are also a few mouths of tributaries that are closed listed here .

Clark Fork has been fishing extremely well in the last week, and we expect that to hold for a while. It’s worth rising and shining to be out by dawn, especially on the lower sections. You expect the streamer fishing to be good at that time, and it is, but the nocturnal stones will pull big fish up to the surface. A Sweetwater Hopper with the back legs cut off or a Flutteriung Stone are very good imitation of the big nocturnal bugs.

If you see steady risers early, put on a Rusty Spinner. They can fall in the early morning, so be ready.

The PMD’s will still show up, but they are definitely waning. Have a Brook’s Sprout, Last Chance Cripple or a Sparkle Dun for the pods that are still forming. A little longer tippet will pay dividends for presentation to fish that have been eating these bugs for about 3 weeks. A double dry with a Rusty Spinner as the dropper greatly increases your odds.

The golden Stones are on their last legs, but the hoppers are just starting, so a “tweener” fly like a Henry’s Fork Golden, Morrish Hopper Tan or an ODB Stone will look like both a hopper and a stone fly. Make sure to have some Yellow Sallies as well. They’re still out, and can be quite effective as the a double dry dropper.

When you go subsurface, make sure you go sub! A Pat’s Rubberlegs or TJ Hooker about 7-8 feet from the indicator always works on the lower section. Not always a joy to cast, but proven. Smaller droppers also work, and again, get them deep. Work the faster water where the oxygen content is higher.

As the heat of the day comes on, start thinking about pike on the lower section. As the trout seek shelter from the heat, the pike are just finding their comfort zone. Choose the fly according to your rod weight, and have a wire bite tippet. If you have a dedicated streamer rod (7-8 wt), a big Cote Whitefish Fly or FireTiger is a strong choice. On lighter rods, a gray articulated streamer like a Boogey Man or Dungeon will get pike’s attention.
Scroll to the bottom of this page for additional fly patterns and tips!

Rock Creek

Rock Creek is in full summer mode right now, with the last few golden stones still being eaten, but we’re pretty sure some are being taken as hoppers. The Henry’s Fork Golden in size 10-14, a Tan Henneberry Hopper and Plan B Golden are working equally well. You can still find some PMD’s and Pale Evening Duns, and of course the Tan Caddis is producing throughout the day.

Get your game face on for the PMD’s and PED’s. The fish have been eating them for a while- they what they want and how it needs to be presented. A little longer tippet with a Missing Link, Film Critic or Brooks Sprout has been effective, but be ready for a few refusals as well. Make sure to have a couple of Rusty Spinners for the refusals- it’s often exactly what they’re looking for. A great combo has been your choice of dry with a Sunken Rusty Spinner on about an 8” dropper. Covers all your bases.

The Tan Caddis is till working as a searching pattern- either Standard or X-Caddis, as well as in the evening. You can work that in the faster water for surprising action.

Atractors and terrestrials are starting to move fish as well. The Ant Acid, Jake’s No Sink Ant and the Tan Micro Chubby are taking fish from classic terrestrial hiding water. Work the grassy banks and under branches. Take your Purple Haze and Brindle Chutes as well. While not a “hot” fly, they are steady flies.

When you go subsurfaces make sure you’re getting deep enough. Size 12 to 16 Perdigons are never wrong- pick the pattern you’re comfortable with and use it. MAKE SURE to get deep enough. In the heat, the fish go deep and hang there, so get your fly to the trout- they may nt travel to you. Streamers through the deep centers will move more fish than you think- as always, the Sparkle Minnow Sculpin is a top producer.

As the heat rises during the day, the fish move into the riffles for more oxygen. When you hook a fish in 90 degree heat, fight it hard and fast, ands stay as close to where you hooked it as possible. Minimal net and photo time- get the fish back into the cooler, oxygenated water. Be ready to lose a fly or two to strong fish fighting- putting the rout back healthy is worth a fly.
Scroll to the bottom of this page for additional fly patterns and tips!

July Hatches

Click any photo below to find out more information on each individual hatch. Includes life cycle, best fly patterns, helpful tips and where to find these hatches in your Western Montana fly fishing adventure.

New Hoot Owl Restrictions

Here in the shop, we have been receiving several questions about the recent “Hoot-Owl” restrictions on the upper Bitterroot. These restrictions require anglers to be off the water from the hours between 2 P.M. and midnight. Most of us have become accustomed to the restrictions that Montana FWP imposes to protect our fisheries during periods of low flow and high-water temperatures.

These new restrictions only affect a few stretches around Missoula as most hoot owl temperature requirements stay the same as they have been in the past. FWP is working towards a goal of protecting native Cutthroat in certain high priority sections of streams.

In most situations, FWP will apply Hoot Owl restrictions when temps are over 73 degrees Fahrenheit for 3 consecutive days. Measured flows may also be a factor in determining when to restrict afternoon and evening fishing. Unfortunately, these restrictions have become all too common in the past 10 to 15 years. Anglers have come to utilize the USGS current conditions webpage to track flows and temps. Anglers have become accustomed to looking for the 73-degree mark.

That’s why the recent restrictions on the Bitterroot have raised a lot of questions. The temps have not reached 73. In August of 2022 FWP decided to set different Hoot Owl triggering temps for streams with high populations of native cutthroat. In short, there are a few streams that restrictions will be triggered by three days over 66 degrees. As far as we know, the Bitterroot and North Fork of the Blackfoot are the streams in the western district that Hoot Owl will be triggered by the 66-degree threshold. You can read about the reasoning for treating cutthroat streams differently here.

In addition, FWP has changed the way that they lift Hoot Owl restrictions. In the past, Hoot Owl was lifted September 15th. There is no longer an arbitrary date. FWP will now use temperature and flow to determine when restrictions are lifted. A few days of cooler temps will not trigger lifting Hoot Owl restrictions avoiding situations where restrictions are implemented and lifted and then implemented again.

As always, if you are not sure if the water you are headed to is under Hoot Owl restrictions or not, stop by the shop. We will have the latest closures and restrictions posted.

Missoula Fly Fishing Report

Missoula Fishing Report 7/9

Fly Fishing Report Brought To You By Our Missoula Fly Fishing Guides And Fly Shop Staff.

Enjoy and Good Luck!

Bitterroot River

The Bitterroot river has been fishing good from top to bottom. Golden Stones, Yellow Sallies and PMD’s have been the bugs of choice. Dry fly fishing with Golend Stones on the upper stretches has been great. Morning Fishing with PMD dries has been good from the top stretches to the bottom. Cold water coming from the West fork is keeping the fishing steady all day long on the upper stretches, while the lower is getting a little warmer and slowing down in the afternoon hours. Not a bad idea to switch to the pike rig in the afternoon on the lower section as there’s been some big ones eating lately. We’ve been throwing mostly single dries, but the dropper game has been strong too.

Scroll to the bottom of this page for additional fly patterns and tips for each hatch

Blackfoot River

The Blackfoot river is fishing good on dries, droppers and streamers. Water temps are warming up in the afternoon, so get out early and go check out one of our great breweries in the afternoon! Fishing the late evening as it cools down is a decent choice with Caddis dries. Morning hatches consist of Sallies, PMD’s and Golden stones. We’ve been fishing mostly single dries up here as the dry fly fishing has been good enough not to have to toss on a dropper. Streamer fishing in the morning has been consistent and some nice fish are moving on them.
Scroll to the bottom of this page for additional fly patterns and tips!

Clark Fork River

The Clark Fork river has been fairly consistent early mornings and late evenings. There’s a mid day lull with the high sun and fishing slows down. Morning dry fly fishing with PMD’s and Golden stones will keep you in business, and Caddis and PED’s in the late evening. Dropper fishing has been consistent throughout the day. Late afternoon water temps are getting a little warm on the Clark Fork, so be quick on the landing and releasing of fish.
Scroll to the bottom of this page for additional fly patterns and tips!

Rock Creek

Rock Creek continues to fish great with cooler water than the bigger rivers. We’re still catching lots of fish on Golden Stones throughout the day and PMD and Yellow Sallies have been good as well. Streamer fishing is a great option this time of year on rock creek as well. Dropper fishing will keep you busy all day long but dry fly has been consistent enough to where you typically don’t need to go subsurface if you don’t want to.
Scroll to the bottom of this page for additional fly patterns and tips!

July Hatches

Click any photo below to find out more information on each individual hatch. Includes life cycle, best fly patterns, helpful tips and where to find these hatches in your Western Montana fly fishing adventure.